Saturday, March 7, 2020

Sports centre Essays

Sports centre Essays Sports centre Essay Sports centre Essay Paper round: as this is my job I kind of have to do this. The cycling helps to build up the leg muscles and improves the aerobic system. Could do time trials when on the way there and back and try to improve my time each day.  Afternoon  Go to the sports centre and first do a certain sport like badminton, racket ball or swimming etc as this will work on the aerobic system. After doing this go to the gym and do whichever circuit you have been given by the trainer. Should hopefully work on aerobic/cardiovascular system, muscular strength, muscular endurance and flexibility. Evening  Nothing: go and play with your friends or just rest!  Tuesday  Morning  Paper round: as this is my job I kind of have to do this. The cycling helps to build up the leg muscles and improves the aerobic system. Could do time trials when on the way there and back and try to improve my time each day.  Bike ride: aim to do 3 hours bike ride around Froyle, Bentley, Binsted etc (suggestions only) and pace yourself to reach the 3 hours. Dont worry about getting up to early because its a Saturday and your next activity is at 14:30; but dont forget lunch! Afternoon  Go to the park to play football or basketball at the park. This way you can enjoy yourself whilst doing an aerobic activity with some anaerobic working (sprints etc) could also go and find the boat and go rowing down the river and work on your upper body strength so undercuts will be easier to save. Row down to Binsted or further. Could also go cycling. Aim to be working for at least 4 hours. Evening  Weights: Firstly do 150 bicep curls, 15 sets of 10 reps as this will help with me stick and glove save. Next do 30 quad thrusts (I think thats what theyre called!) as this will help with my kick in hockey and let me clear the ball further and faster. Afterwards do 70 (7 sets of 10 reps) sit-ups with the 22 lb dumbbells as this will help keep the correct head, knee, tip-toe position throughout the whole match. Lastly do 40 (4 sets of 10 reps) press-ups as this will help with muscles around the arms and the arm muscles. Wednesday  Morning  Paper round: As this is my job, I kind of have to do this. The cycling helps to build up the leg muscles and improves the aerobic system. Could do time trials when on the way there and back and try to improve my time each day.  Afternoon  Go to the sports centre and first do a certain sport like badminton, racket ball or swimming etc as this will work on the aerobic system. After doing this go to the gym and do whichever circuit you have been given by the trainer. Should hopefully work on aerobic/cardiovascular system, muscular strength, muscular endurance and flexibility. Evening  Nothing: go and play with your friends or just rest!  Week 5: Fifth week  Thursday  Morning  Paper round: As this is my job, I kind of have to do this. The cycling helps to build up the leg muscles and improves the aerobic system. Could do time trials when on the way there and back and try to improve my time each day.  Bike ride: aim to do 3 hours bike ride around Froyle, Bentley, Binsted etc (suggestions only) and pace yourself to reach the 3 hours. Dont worry about getting up to early because its a Saturday and your next activity is at 14:30; but dont forget lunch! Afternoon  Go to the park to play football or basketball at the park. This way you can enjoy yourself whilst doing an aerobic activity with some anaerobic working (sprints etc) could also go and find the boat and go rowing down the river and work on your upper body strength so undercuts will be easier to save. Row down to Binsted or further. Could also go cycling. Aim to be working for at least 5 hours. Evening  Weights: Firstly do 150 bicep curls, 15 sets of 10 reps as this will help with me stick and glove save. Next do 40 quad thrusts (I think thats what theyre called!) as this will help with my kick in hockey and let me clear the ball further and faster. Afterwards do 90 (9 sets of 10 reps) sit-ups with the 22 lb dumbbells as this will help keep the correct head, knee, tip-toe position throughout the whole match. Lastly do 50 (5 sets of 10 reps) press-ups as this will help with muscles around the arms and the arm muscles. Friday  Morning  Paper round: as this is my job I kind of have to do this. The cycling helps to build up the leg muscles and improves the aerobic system. Could do time trials when on the way there and back and try to improve my time each day.  Afternoon  Go to the sports centre and first do a certain sport like badminton, racket ball or swimming etc as this will work on the aerobic system. After doing this go to the gym and do whichever circuit you have been given by the trainer. Should hopefully work on aerobic/cardiovascular system, muscular strength, muscular endurance and flexibility. EveningNothing: go and play with your friends or just rest!  Saturday  Bike ride: aim to do 3 hours bike ride around Froyle, Bentley, Binsted etc (suggestions only) and pace yourself to reach the 3 hours. Dont worry about getting up to early because its a Saturday and your next activity is at 14:30; but dont forget lunch! Afternoon  Go to the park to play football or basketball at the park. This way you can enjoy yourself whilst doing an aerobic activity with some anaerobic working (sprints etc) could also go and find the boat and go rowing down the river and work on your upper body strength so undercuts will be easier to save. Row down to Binsted or further. Could also go cycling. Aim to be working for at least 5 hours. Evening  Weights: Firstly do 150 bicep curls, 15 sets of 10 reps as this will help with me stick and glove save. Next do 40 quad thrusts (I think thats what theyre called!) as this will help with my kick in hockey and let me clear the ball further and faster. Afterwards do 90 (9 sets of 10 reps) sit-ups with the 22 lb dumbbells as this will help keep the correct head, knee, tip-toe position throughout the whole match. Lastly do 50 (5 sets of 10 reps) press-ups as this will help with muscles around the arms and the arm muscles. Sunday  Morning  Nothing to do! Stay in bed or get up and do whatever.  Afternoon  Go to the sports centre and first do a certain sport like badminton, racket ball or swimming etc as this will work on the aerobic system. After doing this go to the gym and do whichever circuit you have been given by the trainer. Should hopefully work on aerobic/cardiovascular system, muscular strength, muscular endurance and flexibility.

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Business Coaching Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

Business Coaching - Essay Example With this definition in mind, one can recognize a number of effective leaders; Alexander the Great, Nelson Mandela, Adolf Hitler, Asoka and Mahatma Gandhi etc. Roger, a small business owner, should follow the path of such legendary leaders in order to make his business a true success in the long run. Being an owner of a small business, he needs to keep the following things in his mind. Firstly, Roger should mould his personality to be an inspiring one for his subordinates. His employees should idealize him. When people tend to idealize you, they in turn tend to follow you. To have a charismatic and inspiring personality is a prerequisite to become a successful leader. Further, he should improvise his leadership skills and instill self-confidence, boldness, optimism, patience, tolerance and courage within himself. After working on his personality, skills and abilities, he should start focusing on the organizational culture and structure. Gone are those days when hierarchical structure was praised and acknowledged by people. Being a small business owner, Roger should adopt flat business organizational structure where employees work as teams, help one another selflessly, nobody command others except the owner or the head. It has been observed that this structure of leading and influencing employees has been quite successful in a lot of organizations. Further, roger should create such a business culture, where open communication is encouraged, and the organization is adaptive to change. To survive in this competitive world, being responsive to change and adaptability is crucial and Roger should focus on these areas to survive in the long run. To conclude, Roger, by working on his personality, skills and by introducing team oriented organization which fosters open communication, feedback, quick help and adaptability, can actually take his small business to

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

The changing law Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

The changing law - Essay Example This is illustrated in the manner that an impetus for change is met with either acceptance or reservation by the public to be directly affected, and the legal system who will implement such change. In this regard, this essay aims to discuss the manner that legal change proceeds in the British legal system to illustrate how legal changes are dynamically linked with the society at hand through the Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003. Anti-social behaviour is defined as a behaviour that is "capable of causing a nuisance or annoyance to another person", and "directly or indirectly relates to or affects the housing management functions of a relevant landlord" or that "consists of or involves using or threatening to use housing accommodation owned or managed by a relevant landlord for an unlawful purpose" (Anti-social Behaviour Act [2003] s.153A; s.153B). As a public offence, it has been dealt with by Common Law as public nuisance, considered as both a crime and a tort. Thus, given its potential to harm individuals and communities, and disrupt peace and order, it is of no surprise that the British government pays due attention to this problem by passing the Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003. Prior to 1996 and the Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003, anti-social behaviour is address... This was followed by the Noise Act (1996) and Protection from Harassment Act (1997) to address non-tenure behaviour; and Crime and Disorder Act (1998), which created the Anti-Social Behaviour Order as well as the Police Reform Act (2002) to increase local authorities' enforcement powers. Despite such comprehensive legislations and precedents, however, there are numerous problems that surround both the implementation of the law, on the part of authorities; and prevention of the problem, within the society. This is illustrated in a study conducted by the British Crime survey, where it was reported that except for nuisance and litter, the percentage of individuals perceiving anti-social behaviour as a serious disorder has been rising (cited in Hunter 2003). Furthermore, as evidenced by Nixon and Hunter's study (cited in Hunter 2003), the number of reported complaints for every 1,000 tenancies by housing landlords, has also risen from 1998 to 2003. In addition, there has also been a growing concern among intellectuals that the laws governing anti-social behaviour have the potential to conflict with human rights (Wright, H & Sagar, T 2000, 'Out of Sight, Out of Mind', NLJ, no. 150, p. 1792; Collins, D 2001, 'Anti-social Behaviour Orders - a new false dawn', NLJ, 15 June 2001). In contrast to the human rights argument, however, law enforcement officers and local authorities complain that there is not enough "bite" with the existing laws, such that they are prevented from persecuting offences by juveniles (Wookey v Wookey [1991] Fam 121), and persecuting offenders that persistently commit anti-social behaviour in the totality of their offence (Criminal Justice and Public Order Act [1994] s.5). All the aforementioned problems created a tremendous amount of pressure

Monday, January 27, 2020

Developmentally Appropriate Practices For Students Education Essay

Developmentally Appropriate Practices For Students Education Essay Developmentally appropriate practices (DAP) describe an approach to education that focuses on the child as a developing human being and lifelong learner. This approach recognized the child as an active participant in the learning process; a participant who constructs meaning and knowledge through interaction with others, friends and family, materials and environment (Houser, D. Osborne, C). Developmentally appropriate practices require teachers to make decisions in the classroom by combining their knowledge of child development with an understanding of the individual child to achieve desired and meaningful outcomes (Houser, D. Osborne, C). Research shows that developmentally appropriate practices ensure success in the early grades (Novella, R.). The approach fosters active participation by the child in the learning process. In this process of learning, the teacher acts as the facilitator and guides the child through the activities of the day, in order to reach an outcome the child feels is meaningful. The NAEYC has supportive evidence that suggests that the success or failure of a child in his or her early stages in school could predict the outcome of how they perform later in school (Houser, D. Osbourne, C). This is why there is so much importance placed upon developmentally appropriate practices. Teachers need to realize that teaching methods do have an effect on how students academically develop later in life. An adaptation from the Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Early Childhood Programs, published by the NAEYC, mentions guidelines to help teachers through the DAP process. The Franklin Public Schools, in Franklin MA, made an adaption of the guideline areas, and divided them into four major areas. The areas mentioned are environment, curriculum, assessment, and instructional strategies. Since there is such an importance placed on developmentally appropriate practices, teachers can look at these four major areas to help foster positive learning and optimal development of young children. In the environment area, teachers create an engaging, and responsive environment to enhance the childs learning and development. This type of DAP is applicable to all grade levels. The classroom is supposed to enhance exploration, observation, experiment, and allow for risk taking in a safe environment. If students feel comfortable within their environment, then creative learning will occur. Curriculum planning should be based on how children learn best. For teachers to effectively employ DAP, they must have a thorough understanding about how children develop and learn, therefore, combining this knowledge with the frameworks designated by a given state, teachers should be equipped with adequate resources to help children reach his or her full potential. To optimize each childs progres s in learning, instructional strategies can be used by teachers to ensure success. An example a teacher might use as an instructional strategy would be to observe and interact with whole groups, small groups, or even individually. The benefit to instructional strategies is that it helps students to be motivated and promotes the willingness to take risks. Teachers should ask questions, make comments, and give feedback. This will help stimulate childrens thinking and learning. Assessment in a developmentally appropriate classroom is ongoing, authentic, and purposeful. The developmental needs of students are assessed, teachers adapt instruction to these needs, and the results of assessment are used to improve instruction. Development is an important aspect to how and why children learn. Children pass through several stages before becoming adults. There are four stages of growth where children learn certain things: infancy (birth to age two), early childhood (ages 3 to 8), later childhood (ages 9 to 12), and adolescence (ages 13 to 18) (Borgen, W. Norman, E.). For teachers to effectively teach and understand students, the need to identify developmental behavior is a necessity. Adolescence is the beginning of a more complex thinking process. Since this age group encompasses those from the ages of thirteen to eighteen, teens in this developmental phase experience a variety of behavioral changes. The Adolescent Assessment textbook mentions that in cognitive development, thinking changes both quantitatively and qualitatively during adolescence. Adolescents can think faster and more efficiently than children (Gumbiner, 2003, p.27). Typical cognitive behaviors that adolescent youth encounter are: developing advanced reasoning skills, developing abstract thinking skills, and developing the ability to think about thinking (Novella, R.). Advanced reasoning skills involve answering the question, what if? This skill includes thinking about multiple options and possibilities. The use of more hypothetical and logical thinking skills are used to process information. Abstract thinking is the use of thinking about things that do not actually exist. Prime examples of this type of thinking skill would be religion, faith, or trust. The development of the ability to think about thinking is a process known as meta-cognition. As defined by Websters dictionary, meta-cognition is the awareness or analysis of ones own learning or thinking process. This thinking strategy can be used to improve learning, and an example of this development strategy would be creating mnemonic devices. Cognitive development changes can affect teens in a number of ways. One affect is that teens demonstrate a heightened level of self consciousness. Teens tend to believe that everyone is as concerned with their thoughts and behaviors as they are. Teens also tend to believe that no one has ever experienced the same feelings or emotions as they have. The coined phrase drama queen comes to mind in regard to this statement. In adolescent youth, often heard phrases are, Youll never understand, or You have ruined my life. Another typical cognitive behavior in the adolescent youth is the, It cant happen to me or the, Im invincible syndrome. Teens often use this belief to make risks like drinking and driving, smoking, or other harmful and thoughtless behavioral decisions, without thinking of the consequences. Cognitive behaviors such as the tendency to become overly cause-oriented and to exhibit a justice orientation are also very present in adolescent development. An example of cause-oriented behavior would be a teen becoming vegetarian after reading about cruelty to animals. Justice oriented behavior is the ten dency of teens to point out flaws between adults words and their actions. Teens may confront their parents by saying something like, But you let Johnny (big brother) go to the prom when he was a sophomore. They see little room for error and view points are seen more in black and white, rather than gray. The adolescent youth face many social and emotional development issues. At the adolescent stage in a teens life, establishing an identity, autonomy, and achievement are important developmental components (Novella, R.). As a teenager, one of the most important tasks is trying to answer the question, Who am I? This question, however, is one that teens think about throughout the course of their adolescent years. Teens use the thoughts and opinions of others to come to their own likes and dislikes. They begin to integrate the opinions of people like their parents, other adults, and friends to come their own beliefs and values. Teens who have a secure identity know where they do, or dont fit in the world. A very important social developmental component is the ability for teens to establish autonomy. Autonomy does not mean being a loner and totally independent from others. Autonomy refers to becoming an independent person within relationships (Novella, R). This means that teens have gained the ability to make independent decisions based on what they feel is right or wrong. Autonomy is important for adolescent teens because it helps them become less emotionally dependent on parents. To become self-sufficient in society, autonomy is a necessary achievement for teens. Achievement is also an important social development behavior for teens because it helps them realize their strengths and weaknesses. Competition and success are valued attitudes in the American culture. The American culture is immensely influenced by competition. There has been a large increase in the number of reality shows produced like, American Idol and Americas Got Talent. These shows epitomize the essence of completion in American culture today. Individualism and purpose, in social cognition development, as stated in the Adolescent Assessment textbook, mentions that, moral reasoning is based on rewards and self-interest. In other words, a teenager will work hard to obtain good grades to be accepted t o a prestigious university (Gumbiner, 2003, p.27). Teens need to study their strengths and realize where their achievement preferences are, and in what areas they are willing to strive for success (Novella, R.). Every teenager is unique and will invariably experience different social and emotion development issues. There are a variety of typical behavior patterns of social behavior development. Teens begin to spend more time with their friends than their parents. Also, teens may begin to keep a journal as part of tracking ones own thought and opinions. This method helps teens work through how they feel. Teens may begin to lock their bedroom door. This is a way teens wish to establish privacy. Other behaviors include the involvement of multiple hobbies and the elusiveness about where they are going or with whom. Teens may become more argumentative, or not want to be seen with parents in public. Although teens may be more argumentative and not want to be seen in public with parental figures, they may begin to view parents more as people. Teens may start asking questions like, I wonder what my parents were like as a teen? (Novella, R.). Britannica Encyclopedia defines psychomotor learning as, development of organized patterns of muscular activities guided by signals from the environment. This type of behavior combines cognitive functions and physical movements. Learning is demonstrated by physical skills such as movement, strength, speed, etc. An example of psychomotor assessment that the Classroom Assessment textbook mentions would include testing of students keyboarding skills in computer class or students prowess in shooting a basketball in gym class (Popham, 2008, p.35). In psychomotor development, the focus is on coordinated learning from the arms, hands, feet, fingers, while verbal processes are not emphasized. For adolescent teens, behavioral examples would include driving a car, and any eye-hand coordination tasks, such as athletics, or playing musical instruments. For teachers, the cognitive, social/emotional, and psychomotor development of adolescent teenagers can have an impact on learning. It is important for teachers to know what they can do to effectively reach teenage students. It would be beneficial for teachers to be able to relate to his/her students in whatever way possible. Gaining respect from teens is an important element that can aid teachers in behavioral development. If students know you listen and care about them, you will earn their respect, and they will be more likely to share their feelings. To combat the cognitive behavior of it cant happen to me, teachers can provide opportunities for teens to participate in supervised risky behavior such as extreme sports. Lots of schools have athletic teams like wrestling, or rugby, which are intense sports. Teens tend to want to get involved with things that have deeper meanings, so encouraging students to get involved with community service activities, or other school related activit ies, like student government, can greatly benefit student behavior. Teachers can take the opportunity to discuss students view and opinions about certain topics in the news, or on television. This can help with the development of personal beliefs, and help engage students to think independently. The impact of learning that the social/emotional development can have on teens is that this is the time when teens are trying to establish themselves. Assigning activities like weekly personal reflections or discussions of current events could help teens begin to think about their own thoughts and opinions in certain topics areas. This also helps students gain confidence in discussing their beliefs in front of the class. Another useful method may be to include more group involvement. Since teens like to be with other teens, let them work on tasks together. This could encourage social and problem solving skills. It is important for teachers to take development into consideration when planning lessons and activities for the classroom. Knowing how and why students act the way they do is important to effectively reaching the classroom audience. Since adolescent teenagers are concerned with friends, image, psychomotor development tasks, such as sports, then knowing these motivational behaviors can help a teacher know how to get through to his/her students. If you have an educational objective that is pretty cut and dry, then finding a way to either incorporate kinesthetic movement, or social interaction will probably increase the likely hood that students will master that objective. At the adolescent age, teenagers are very focused on factors other than school. It would be beneficial for teachers to realize the cognitive, social/emotional, and psychomotor development behavior of teens at this age. This would allow the teacher to have a better grasp on why students behave the way they do. Teacher s can have a major impact on students during this time in their life. There are a variety of changes, both physical and non-physical that are occurring to students in the adolescent stages of development. Teens face both challenges at home and at school. A teacher can benefit by being open minded and creative in creating lesson plans. Teens at this age enjoy moving around, working in groups, and talking out loud, so incorporating these elements into projects or assessments may prove to be successful. Lastly, the importance of being a good listener will be stressed again. Students at this age have a lot going on in their lives. Having a teacher who is willing to develop a personal relationship with his/her students creates a trusting environment. A trusting environment will lead to respect; respect leads to open ears, open ears leads to mastery of knowledge, and mastery of knowledge leads to a happy classroom.

Sunday, January 19, 2020

Food Web Diagram

Mojave Desert Organisms * Planate (Vegetation) – Brittle Bush, California Juniper, Creosote Bush, Common Saltbush, Joshua Tree, Mojave Aster, and Triangle-leaf Bursage * Animalia (Animals) – Mammals include coyote, desert bighorn sheep, desert kit fox, spotted skunk, spotted bat, black-tailed jackrabbit, ground squirrels, kangaroo rat and white-footed mouse. Birds include eagles, hawks, owls, quail, roadrunners, finches, warblers and orioles. Reptiles include desert (Gopher Tortoise), several species of rattlesnakes and chuckwalla lizard * Micro-organisms – Fungi (penicillium), monera (mycorrhizae, lichens, azotobacter and streptomycetes, mycoplasmas, and cyanobacteria) Coyote Canus latrans * Organs are essentially the same as humans with minor adaptations * Lungs are bigger for more oxygen intake while being active * The part of the brain referred to as the â€Å"lizard brain† is slightly larger than that of a normal human * Unlike humans, they can digest raw meat with no negative side effects * Their metabolisms are faster They have a Jacobson’s organ that gives scent information to the brain The Roadrunner Geococcyx californianus * Reabsorbs water from feces and excretes excess salt through a nasal gland * Will extract water from its lizard prey * Reduces activity 50% during the heat of midday P C D Desert Food Chains Food chains allow us to examine the basics of how energy passes through an ecosys tem. Producer | Consumer | Predator | A food chain is sequence of plants, herbivores and carnivores, through which energy and materials move within an ecosystem. Food chains are usually short and not more than three or four links. They usually consist of a producer, a consumer and a predator, with the predator being the top of the food chain. The top of the desert food chain does eventually die though, and is returned to the bottom of the chain as nutrients by decomposers. Typical Desert Food Chains Mountain Lion Mule Deer Plant (forbs)| Coyote Quail Plant (shrub seeds)| Snakes Lizards Insects Plant (wildflower/grass | Hawk Snakes Rats Plant (seeds)| Typical Desert Food Pyramid Tertiary Consumers Carnivores These are high level consumers, carnivores that will eat other carnivores. Secondary Consumers Small Carnivores The predators are the secondary consumers. They occupy the third trophic level. Again we see cold-blooded animals, such as snakes, insect-eating lizards, and tarantulas. Only about 2 Kilocalories per square meter per year are stored in their bodies. In the harsher desert environments, they are the top predators. Primary Consumers Herbivores These animals are usually small and eat little. Many are insects, or reptiles, who are cold blooded and who use less energy to maintain their bodies than mammals and birds do. As food for predators, they provide about 20 Kilocalories per square meter per year for predators. Including: Ants and other insects, rats and mice, some reptiles the largest of which are the tortoise and chuckwalla. Primary Producers Plants These are plants that make food through photosynthesis. Limited by the availability of water, they produce fewer than 200 Kilocalories of food for the animals for each square meter each year. Including: Trees, shrubs, cactus, wildflowers, grasses Primary Producers: is occupied by the primary producers-plants. Plants produce energy from photosynthesis. Plants produce energy to use for survival, growth and to store when production resources are not available. Primary Consumers: Primary consumers are the animals that eat the plants. These animals, including insects, mammals, such as the desert pocket mouse, food is consumed and converted to energy. References Blue Planet Biomes. (2011). Mojave Desert. Retrieved from http://www. blueplanet Biomes. org/mojave_desert. htm Desert Wildlife. (2011). Digital-Desert. Retrieved from http://digital-desert. com/wildlife/ coyote. html Google. (2011). Google Images. Retrieved from http://www. google. com/imagres? q=†¦

Saturday, January 11, 2020

What is the value of people management to project management?

Abstract People skills and their value to project management have become a substantial topic of debate as the international community develops business strategies. This essay examines the project management field with a focus of evaluating the importance of the human element. The evidence presented demonstrates that developing strategies are relying more often on an adaptive framework that incorporates heavy human resources and relations efforts with positive results. This work will be of interest to any person studying the field of project management. 1 Introduction The question of how important people skills are in project management efforts has become a growing topic of debate (Morgeson et al, 2013). Seemingly once overlooked, the elements of human resources and the potential to encourage a higher rate of performance suggest an emerging innovative nature among the leaders of the business community. Beginning with a base overview of project management efforts, this essay works to illustrate the importance that the ability to effectively manage people can have on any form of project. 2 Project Management The commonly held definition of project management is the entire creation and control of a specific aim made up of several interlocking elements including planning, acquisition, motivation and resolution of day to day issues (Lock et al, 2013). This definition outlines the expectation that the project manager is the person in control of any individual effort, making each of the decisions that this persons makes critical to the nature of the underlying project. There are a wide range of management choices to be made from the very first, withincluding incremental, iterative, phased and lean making each element fragile (Lock et al, 2013). With each separate method of implementation there is a real focus on creating a strategy that is effective at managing resources as well as successfully reaching deadlines and achieving goals. In order to achieve this first step and reach a positive conclusion, the skill of efficiently utilising resources, including employees and human resources, must be a cornerstone of strategy (Larsen et al, 2013). This revelation suggests a tacit support for the inclusion of the human element at every level of emerging project planning theory. Yet, with this rising recognition of value and potential in the human resources element, the question of why previous generations did not associate such potential becomes a question. Two central approaches to project management have come to encompass the field; Traditional and Agile (Kerzner, 2003). With the names signifying the defining parameters of each avenue the traditional has been the most used and recognised process with the Agile form coming to represent the need to remain flexible, or adaptable in the face of modern competition and circumstances (Kerzner, 2003). The Agile method is based on the traditional approach with an increased emphasis on the associated human elements that contribute to the trait of adaptability (Kerzner, 2003). As the case study of ITNET in the UK in 2003 suggested that the addition of soft skills or increased human resources capacity adds a great deal in area of motivation to any on-going project (Cowie, 2003). This is suggestive that t at the turn of the century there was a building recognition of human resources skill value as well as the need to maintain this level of skill in the developing systems in order to enhance succe ss opportunities. Of the several approaches offered, the traditional method has been commonly associated with a general project management application (Pandey, 2008). This avenue consists of five well recognised principles that are expected to be met, with each area directly associated with employee, or human, oversight. Initiation, design, execution, monitoring and completion make up the most common stages of any project (Pandey, 2008). In every area this argument suggests that there is a basic need for human resources, and therefore there rests the potential for streamlining and improving performance. This is highly suggestive of the condition that there is a valid supposition for the inclusion of human resources in a progressive strategy.2.1 ProcessesCreating a starting point for any project, the initiation process marks the moment that the base nature and effectiveness of the effort is determined (White et al, 2002). This requires a thorough understanding of the complexities of the task at hand a s well as complete knowledge of the associated timetable and available resources. The placement of a quality person adds to the potential for a project to succeed from the moment this evaluation and determination takes place (Hiriyappa, 2009). This stage outlines the needs of the project as associated with the operating elements, which in turn is directly impacted by the choices of the person in charge (Hiriyappa, 2009), suggesting that this initial decision to put a person in place could be among the most critical of project management accomplishments. The planning and design stage of any project is directly responsible for developing the underlying strategy that takes into account every element (Kerzner, 2003). This suggests that again, effective decision-making qualities and the capacity to identify positive properties in the associated employees allows for a smoother execution of strategy. Further, the human element of estimation and risk planning is directly associated with the personnel in place, which in turn can determine the success or failure of any project (Larsen et al, 2013). The evidence is suggestive of the demonstration that human resource decisions at this level reflect the needs of the project and assist in determining how well the effort is undertaken. The stage of execution follows planning, which in turn, requires an effective human resource effort in order to ensure that the standards of the developing project (Karjewski et al, 1999). This is an indication that components, such as direct management, quality control and long term planning, must be efficiently addressed at this stage, requiring human skills. This stage cannot be effectively concluded without testing the implementation efforts, which in turn demands the presence of leadership (Morgeson et al, 2013). Closely tied to the final stages of the traditional approach to project management, the execution stage leads to the control and monitoring of any project (Morgenson et al, 2013). This process of measurement and assessment require knowledge, experience and skill in order to properly operate, which requires a well-placed person, or team, with the inherent capacity to meet these standards (Greenbert et al, 2005). Lacking an effective human resource placement, there is the real potential for a project to be diminished or halted all together, making this area once again one of pivotal importance. The final stage of the commonly held process is closing, or the true ending of the effort, with final closing and contract closure (Andersson et al, 2013). As each area of the project is judged complete and the terms of the contracts have been acknowledged, the leadership to efficiently tie up every remaining task is vital (Lock et al, 2013). This suggests that effective human resource skills at this juncture enable a far better understanding and capacity to complete and close out a project. As the evidence in the argrument demonstrates, there is a need for human resource considerations at every stage of the project management process. At each level the critical decisions needed require thoughtful and well-rounded people skills that has the inherent capacity to add a tremendous amount of positivity to any project.2.2 MethodologiesWith the science of project management continuing to develop over the course of time, thereare several different approaches used in the effort to attain success (Lock et al, 2013). Clear differences in needs and goals make the choice of methodological tool essential to the project .Since its creation in the mid 1990’s the Prince2 has provided an output-oriented project management framework that has been used by many in the business world (Andersson et al, 2013). The Prince2 concept of management has been utilised by the Cheshire Constabulary in a positive manner dating from the year 2010 (Day, 2010). This system is credited with allowing the project to succeed and improve focus and overall results, yet at the same moment the case study acknowledges the support and human resources that were innate to the success of effort (Day, 2010). This is suggestive of the fact that human skills were needed during the effort. This perception that the framework allowed the leadership to remain on course and succeed in Cheshire, supports the need for an effective system. Yet, as Larsen et al (2013) argues in his project management work, the developing field of business requires new skills, which in turn continues to make the area of human resources essential to operations such as the Cheshire Constabulary. The Agile project management method employs an enhanced human component in order to attain goals and reach success (Larsen et al, 2013). Used more often in the world of technology and creativity, the Agile approach is different from the traditional planning method in that it is made up of many smaller elements combined, making it nearly impossible to plan beforehand (Larsen et al, 2013). The Agile project management process has been utilised at several high level projects that required creative and adaptive thinking with the inherent ability to find solutions outside of the norm. The United States Federal Bureau of Investigation, or FBI, uses the Agile method in their Sentinel Project to a notable success, demonstrating the effectiveness of the process (Wernham, 2012). During the course of this effort, the Agile system was credited with recognising the potential in the employee’s and providing the means for leadership to make the most of it (Wernham, 2012). This evidence sugge sts that the incorporation of increased human relations ability increases the capacity of the effort to succeed, even in a very high stress environment. A second example of the Agile project management system finding traction in the modern world is found in the company Mastak (Somal, 2013). The need for an adaptable platform that with the ability to incorporate international opportunities, led to the decision to use the Agile approach. With the development and conclusion of the initial project, the Agile system was credited with providing the company the knowledge to produce what their clients needed through a better appreciation of the human element (Somal, 2013). This application of enhanced human resources to aid in the communication and day to day interaction with consumers to increase use, suggests that the area there potential in this area to a low cost method of enhancing production. With each method, the utilisation of human resources and leadership is vital to the success of the project. This is suggestive that the developing methods such as Agile will become more prominent as the need for adaptability continues to grow.2.3 Human Resources Skill SetNew and developing skill sets are necessary in order to accommodate the evolving area of project management and human resources (Miller, 2013). New skills, including sharing the vision and making workshops available, begin to play a role in developing communication (Miller, 2013). Further, the opportunity to assess needed change allows for the leadership to anticipate the needs of their employees, which in turn must be carried out in planning for these needs to be met (Miller, 2013). This requirement for adaptability is best demonstrated by the leadership, which in turn provides impetus for others to be influenced, thereby creating the needed environment (Miller, 2013). Finally, there should be a continual effort o f communication education aimed at making the most of every personnel opportunity, thereby enriching the entire effort. At every step of these suggested enhancements rests the base requirement of increased psychological engagement with the employee’s in order to make the project possible 3. Conclusion The question of how much importance people skills are in the project management effort has been assessed in the body of this essay with several interesting results. Efforts from the turn of the century illustrate a growing awareness of the need for increased employee outreach and communication. This trend is further supported by the additional case studies presented throughout the first decade of the century highlighting the success of project management methods using increased human resource outreach. The developing world of international business, with software, internet concerns and banking leading the way, are demanding a more adaptable method of project management, which in turn requires managers and employees that have the capacity to change on a moment’s notice. As this essay has shown, the importance of people management to the overall project is as essential as the presence of resources and funding. In the end, the evidence presented in this essay clearly suggests th at lacking a primary component, such as people management skills, creates the potential for a diminished project. 4. References Andersson, L., Jackson, S. and Russell, S. (2013). Greening organizational behaviour: An introduction to the special issue. Journal of Organizational Behaviour, 34(2), pp.151–155. Cowie, G. (2003). The importance of people skills for project managers. Industrial and Commercial Training, 35(6), pp.256–258. Day, M. (2011). A Case Study: The Cheshire Constabulary Case Study. 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